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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
the u.s. and his country. you can see that live at 4:00 p.m. eastern. it will be on our companion network, c-span. we continue the prime time booktv programing later tonight looking at civil rights move. wed look at authors, mary francis berry and taylor brand. that will be. on c-span 3 tonight at same time, american history focusing on american artifact. we have smithsonian curator, eleanor jones harvey. she will talk about photographs and paintings from the civil war. all that here on the c-span networks. >> okay. folks. okay. we're going to get the second keynote speaker started here while you're enjoying your lunch. but first i would like to thank our gold sponsors for supporting us today. they are centurylink government, blue coat federal, hewlett-packard, info blocks, juner per networks, lockheed martin, net app, palo alto networks, red hat, red seal networks, taurus advanced, enterprise solutions and verizon. special thanks to those. as we enjoy our lunch i will introduce miss tina kune. vice president of northrop grumman and one of our diamond response source for today's -
prepare for defense against the threat to u.s. territory because of this coming capability, i think china is going to say, that's unacceptable. i'm hopeful. but at the end of the day as i say, the united states can't sit there waiting just for china. we have to be working with our allies on a comprehensive strategy, again, trying to let the region know that we want to be that important security guarantor. we also want to be a major trader, investor to the region and with asia-pacific. and for the stability and that trade and investment, and for prosperity and liberty to take root in this entry, any dynamic century with a rising asia pacific, it's going to have to take greater stability than north korea is right now letting it have. so for those initial comments, i will turn it back to our chairman. >> well, thank you, patrick the as always, very comprehensive argument. the floor is open. before we open the floor -- [inaudible] >> i want to pick up on patrick's point, and elaborate on what i see as the elephant in the room, which is china. outgoing defense secretary panetta told the house
structures in europe and in the u.s. but there's another reason. the reason is, that has been said this morning, of course, economy is not always and only about data, but it's also about hegemony. it's a fight about ideas and the question is what kind of ideas? give you one little example. when we are talking about the europe crisis in europe, conservatives have reached one thing. the euro crisis on their view, and that is agreed on by many politicians and also by the public, the euro crisis is a crisis and has its reasons, in the public deficit. this is only one small part that they succeeded in bringing this view through, and it's also, that has consequences of course for economic policies. and, therefore, it's very important, and, of course, american economic debate has huge influence on european debates. it's very important that we are talking together, that we are working together and that we are trying to make a more differentiated approach on what and how to make policies engage the crisis. and that is, that is important because, and let me say that, because this room is ful
:00 eastern and our companion network, c-span. the u.s. senate is not in today as democrats and republicans continue their policy retreat. lawmakers will return tomorrow at 9:30 a.m. to continue work on a bill to reauthorize and the violence against women act. you can see this and that live here on c-span2. the u.s. house is in session. members passed a bill requiring president obama to submit a balanced budget to congress. the vote was 253-167. the house is done with less with a work for the wheat. members will be out the next couple of days. democratic members can attend their retreat. follow live on c-span when members return next week. coming up, live as a group of republican national security leaders from the house and senate armed services committee holds a press briefing to discuss averting defense sequestration. live coverage at 145 eastern here on c-span2. until then, yesterday a bipartisan group of house members introduced a new bill that would make gun trafficking a federal crime. that would also penalize straw purchasers who buy guns for convicted felons are prohibited from buyi
and speed is everything. so within our broad workforce, our larger u.s. workforce, you know, we complement our u.s. workforce with foreign workers. and mobility is very important, so we hire people from college campuses on -- we also use immigrant visas as well and green card. for people on h-1bs, or people, citizens working with deloitte. and then we also use, we look at people who have expertise and specialized knowledge from around the world that we can bring into the united states. so we leverage other -- but it really is a matter of leveraging those to ensure that our clients receive the most timely modern and technology process so they can innovate as best as they can. you know, we all know the statistics about 20% of companies founded in the us had immigrant found. 40% of fortune 500 were founded i immigrant of a child, or an immigrant. and a lot of those companies are our client. so broad point is certainly for america to stay competitive in this economy we need to modernize and change the way we employ our talent, and that we encourage people who get educated in the united states,
for the world's innovation. they are a big part of why the u.s. remains the destination for the world's vest and brightest. investment in education leads to innovation, which leads to more opportunity, and jobs for all. our problem, the investment we make is not yielding the maximum return. each year our colleges and universities graduate approximately 40,000 foreign nationals, with masters and ph.d degrees. many of whom are then forced to leave the country because there's not enough visa slots in our immigration system to get them to stay. so rather than being able to invent things here in america, grow businesses or start one of their own, they do all these things somewhere else. now, one grocer with us today. she's earning her master at gw inching school of njn applied sciences. originally from china she's been in united states for five years, starting operation research and an assist and injuring department if you talk to your you will see, she's pretty smart your she would like to stay here. she wants to invest her talents in america, and maybe even start her own company. but she has se
's number-one priority will be taking care of our troops. he is a veterans' advocate with the u.s.o. and he's won the respect and admiration of veterans' groups, in addition he's won the support of an extraordinary array of former secretaries of defense, ambassadors and diplomats, senior retired military leaders and in particular, two former members of this body who appeared with him at his testimony, former senators warren and nunn. i believe that chuck hagel is the right man for the challenges, the fiscal challenges that will confront the department of defense. put aside sequester, which i dearly hope will not happen, secretary panetta said it would be irresponsible for the congress to allow it to happen. many of us agree, it must be avoided. but apart from that challenge in the next month, or series of months, the long-term outlook for the department of defense is that it must do more with less, and secretary hagel, if he is confirmed, will have that management task, and he is one of the people in this country who is almost uniquely qualified to carry it out. and i believe that he will w
into a good movie. >> do you have any plans on expanding beyond the u.s. for instance if to europe [inaudible] thank you. >> international coverage is really interesting. i think that we are trying every single print issue of the magazine in at least a couple times a week to always have international content in the next. so we have had reported pieces from venezuela or we had someone embedded in afghanistan and we ran up peace in the last two issues on that so it's really important. the question just from the business standpoint is the economics that more often than not it works best for us to work with freelance reporters contributing for us in "the new york times" as well so we can get the content in the magazines but we don't have the bureau in paris or coal or something like that -- kabul or something like that that is the key to having a broad magazine in the future. >> are you going to make it weekly again? >> i don't think so. we don't have any plans to. it was hysterically, the previous ownership brought it down to buy a weekly. when i first bought the magazine i was a little skeptica
of medical m.r.i.'s. if we're to compete successfully and keep quality jobs here in the u.s., we need to invest robustly both in a 21st century infrastructure as well as in a system of education and training that equips our young people and workers for the jobs of the future. so in this broader context, what is the best way to address the resulting deficits? do we just slash spending for education? slash spending for infrastructure. slash spending for research and discovery? sacrificing investments that we'll need to grow our economy in the decades ahead? do we just allow this destructive sequester to kick in, costing us jobs, cutting vital supports for middle-class americans. madam president, these are the destructive budget options that will take effect starting tomorrow if we fail to act. that's why i've come to the floor today at the 11th hour to plead one final time for compromise and common sense from republicans. yes, i'm here to plead for some common sense, some compromise from republican leadership. now there are plenty of areas where we can cut spending without seriously har
a central psychological or political space in the u.s., russian relationship. i don't think that's true where russia is. further on, that was on page one of the report. then it says this about bilateral and nuclear arms negotiations on page 16. >> would you forgive the interruption? i think i'm able to set a time for a vote now if we can get some idea about how long you want to speak him and i'm not trying to limit you. can you give us an idea about how long? i just talked to senator blumenthal and i want to ask senator hirono the same question. >> i just want to share a few thoughts spent know, is five minutes enough? >> seven. >> that's no problem. senatosenator hirono, how long t you speak? senator blumenthal? i'm now going to schedule a vote for 5:00. you about at five. we will hopefully have just about everybody there. if not, if somebody's on their way we can stay here until everybody has an opportunity either to vote in person or vote by proxy. senator sessions, so 5:00 we will start the vote. senator sessions, forgive the interruption. >> let me ask one question, mr. chair. ther
nuclear weapons in the middle east and the decrease of u.s. influence in the region. then in about half an hour we're live with the closing session of the national governors' association's annual winter meeting as tv's dr. oz speaks to the group on government responsibility for the personal wellbeing of its citizens. and later the senate returns at 2 p.m. eastern following its weeklong presidents' day recess when new hampshire senator, kelly ayotte, delivers the annual reading of president george washington's 1796 of farewell address. >>> also today on the c pan networks, the bipartisan policy center's housing commission releases its recommendations for future federal policy. it's expected to address summits including -- subjects including housing finance and affordable rent. the report is being released by former senate majority leader george mitchell, former hud secretaries mel martinez and henry cisneros, and former missouri governor and senator kit bond. live coverage from the newseum in washington begins at 11 a.m. eastern over on c-span. >> on route 66, you know, people were trave
't want. >> i'm a student of the kennedy school. do you have any plans on expanding beyond u.s., for instance, to europe? [inaudible] hasn't been very successful expanding to many european countries. thank you. >> yeah. we're looking -- international coverage is really interesting. i think that we're trying every single print issue of the magazine at least a couple times a week to always have international content be in the mix. so we've had reported pieces from venezuela, or we had someone who was embedded in the afghanistan. we ran a piece in the last two issues ago on that. so it's really important. the question for us from just a business standpoint is, um, the economics of it. more often than not it works for us, it works best for us to work with freelance reporters or who are contributing for us and luke, who i just mentioned contributes for "the new york times" as well, and so we can get the content, we can get the ideas in the magazine we don't have, you know, a bureau in paris or kabul or something, something like that. so, but the international stuff, i think, is key
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)